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Reviews
Various Artists - Emerging Organisms Vol.2
Wednesday, July 01 2009 @ 03:00 AM PDT
Contributed by: Jack The Ripper

Emerging Organisms Vol.2

Artist: Various Artists

Title: Emerging Organisms Vol.2

Label: Tympanik Audio United States

Genre: IDM / Rhythmic Noise / Ambient / Trip hop / Industrial

Track Listing:

EO1
01 Hecq - The glow
02 Mlada fronta - Uuo 118
03 Dryft - Transmission
04 Flint Glass - Al-Azif
05 Architect - Keks (Tympanik edit)
06 Access to Arasaka - 400 bloc overground
07 Zentriert ins Antlitz - Where their dreams live
08 Flaque - Whispers
09 Subheim - Take me back
10 Aphorism - Expanse
11 Totakeke - Patient HM (Response to conditioning mix)
12 Mnemonic - Prototyp
13 Marching dynamics - Even blood is not enough

EO2
01 Stephen James Knight - Lodestar
02 Rope – This flightless bird (Clipped wings)
03 Stendeck – Lullabies from the cliff by the ranging sea
04 DJ hidden -  Things to come
05 Keef Baker - Bogbrush
06 Ginormous - Redcliff
07 Anhedonia – Different places
08 Atmogat - Mi. Interface
09 Tapage – The unspoiled
10 Sincere trade – Danger, stop, stay
11 Blackfilm – Walk with me
12 Autoclav v1.1 vs ESA – All blind
13 Lights out Asia – Outstretched to the middle of sky

“The future is now”. This may sound as an odd expression, it has been used so many times that may seem look as if it has no sense at all anymore, but it is a fact, when you appreciate certain things of an upraised magnitude towards certain regions that have been unexplored for human hearing, when you are able to perceive at least the complex aural visionary like state exposed from brilliant creative minds then you simply understand their legitimate reach of their creations, a place that could only resides in the future as everything in comparison sounds far reaching and less adventurous, and then the phrase quoted at the beginning gains a special significance. Second compilation “Emerging Organisms 2” from ever increasing famous label Tympanik Audio is a breakthrough from the most outstanding young talents that the scene can offer and the secured condition for the ones already discovered by the label in previous deliveries. All of them present a compendium of outstanding aural manifestations that brings the aural comprehension of the future today. So if you are waiting for your wildest utopias to materialize this may be a way to channel them aurally through the vanguardist compendium consolidated here. “The future is now”.

The great variety of artists presented in this double disk compilation shows the big dimension from the scene and also the quality of its members. Some names has already been introduced on the first serie and many others are debuting on this one, but above all is clear that they all pertain to a same status, whether it is referenced by their abilities alone or the complementary generic brotherhood. The compilation displays a clear experimental side where all the recent foundations from electronic music takes a dominant role. Traces of sublime ambient and rhythmic noise maladies, IDM sophisticated elaborations, obscured industrials and melancholic trip-hop will be found rigorously administered by each one of the participants with an ever adventuring program on hand, granting a trip in the rollercoaster the leads to the “world of tomorrow”. The first three tracks will accustom the listener to the predominant mood that the first disk will generally regulate in, indicating that the incidence for ambient will be fundamental to irradiate the tracks and to contextualize the whole aural experience in.

The chilling opener track by Hecq “The glow” will simply propel the listener to heavens. A majestic group of glorious synth layers constructed with celestial frequencies, forming an angelic like atmosphere where chorals and synth pads accommodate with a low paced flow absent from any complementary rhythm. This track is some kind of singularity during the whole work and perhaps one of the best examples on modern Ambient you can get. Posterior track by Mlada Fronta takes where this leaves, taking a spacious drone set electrified by a whole channel of glitch sequences and additional analog lines, elevating higher and higher the listener in a place filled with subtle Electro vibes magnetized in radiant ambience. “Transmission” by Dryft preoccupies too with atmosphere, constructing emotional and soothing analog sequences but integrates dusty textures and explosive outbursts of rhythmic noise during the track advancement. These additional electronic incidences inside the tracks start to trascend a palpable sense of evolution in the course of the compilation. From the rather minimalist entrance in the first track to the subtle additions of sequences and rhythms to noise fragments on the subsequent ones. Ambience starts to be molecularly divided and added. But these tracks will constitute the soul of what the first disk itemizes, that is ambient and texture as the very centre where all the subsequent rhythm and effects will gravitate.

Which songs to highlight? All, considering the amount of alternative visions and ultra adventurous compositional value but some should present prevalence in order to synthesize as they all sum the characteristics comprised in the album, such as tones and styles, different moods and textures that exemplifies the wholeness. “Where their dreams live” by Zentriert ins Antlitz is an amazing middle end that portrays all the characteristics from the best ambient you can imagine, bright atmospheres, brushes of melancholy, and a pinch of darkness combined with an amalgam of ultra complex breaks and chops, glitch details, Vocoder and mini electro sequences to complement, creating a track of exuberant beauty and elegantly detailed. The luscious “Whispers” by Flaque. A collage of somber drones and melancholic synth lines followed by a comprised loop of syllables that sounds exactly as a hectic pack of whispers followed by a tapestry of rhythmic arrangements. These tracks progresses and takes the form of something aerial, virtually making the listener to levitate. And then we have “Take me back” by the famed Subheim. A combo of organic beeps with a marked darkly tone, exotic electronics and on top of it a perfect sampler addendum of an operatic line. This is luxuriating darkness!

Rests of the tracks are worth representatives of the ultra futuristic scene described in this compilation. Al-azif takes IDM to the next step in the scale of progression and plasticity. Architect formalizes the introduction of dark ambient in the reign of IDM. Acces to Arasaka is the symbioses of rhythmic noise accessing electro and over killing with smart ambience. The additional exemplification of the retro feel demonstrated by Aphorism with his revival of sequential combos from the 80s aligned by the complex electronic logistics from IDM. Or the awkward version of rhythmic cuts, ultra fat beats and acidic atmosphere studied by the famous Mnemonic. Not to mention the celebrated tribal bizarreness and explosive rhythms from Marching dynamics.

Second disk will present a variant. Atmosphere is reduced and rhythm and melody takes prevalence instead, quite the contrary huh? Tympanik never cease to amaze. Guess what, the play came out well. Rhythms in here take a heavy route, and rhythmic noise is expanded to painful margins. Nevertheless incidences from Jazz chops, some breaks, acid sequences and tribalism will be present too. “Bogbrush” by master Keef Baker marks the decisive take off on the rough side of rhythm, blending expanding rusty beats, rapid breaks, insane textures and genius analog sequences into a critical mass of singular explosiveness. The compositional cunning from Baker has no paragon in the scene. The whole body of sound he creates with this track is simply mind-blowing. If there is a way to synthesize heavy electronica and complicated atmospheres, Baker surely knows where is the gap to get in. Then we have one of the stars from Tympanik, that is Tapage, offering: “The Unspoiled” A groovy industrial piece full of catchy sequences and intriguing effects. Sincere trade with “Danger, stop, stay” a sentimental journey full of cinematic atmosphere and magic motion. The delicious “Walk with me” with a strong sense of melody focused on jazzy cuts, inspiring a mellow trip-hop accompanied by varied rhythms and bright atmospherics and finally the incredible “All blind” by Autoclav v1.1 vs ESA with their post rock anchored in melancholic ambient, downtempo rhythms and a cocktail of electronic effects.

In general the compilation is mobile but with an integrated side for a transpared transcendence, compositionally mature and serious, portraying the experience and experimental syncretism from all the authors involved. Generally containing a highly reflexive mood with extreme dedication on atmospheric leanings and extreme rhythms for the dance halls of the brightest aural addicts and eager electronica fans. In retrospective this is a rather complex compilation and very difficult to analyze, every band and every track presents highly guessed right ideas and aural elaborations making the listener to focus in the details and the more subjective impression they may eventually cause. Very well compiled effort made by Tympanik, exemplifying the best of the future today. Dark atmospherics and exotic complex rhythms will pave the way for two hours of pure emotion and mind travelling.

     



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