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Reviews
Fennesz - Black Sea 12"
Wednesday, July 01 2009 @ 03:00 AM PDT
Contributed by: Sage

Black Sea 12\"

Artist: Fennesz Austria

Title: Black Sea 12"

Label: Touch United Kingdom

Genre:  Ambient / Modern Classical

Side A:
01 Black Sea
02 Perfume for Winter
03 Grey Scale

Side B:
04 Glide
05 Glass Ceiling
06 Saffron Revolution

There are times that a journalist will sit here and tell you that an album is so good that he simply can't find much to say on it.  Most of the time, to be quite honest, that's just the journalist trying to create a viable excuse for his own writers block.  But once in a while, maybe once or twice, perhaps up to 4 or 5 times in a journalists career as a writer, he will come to the conclusion that a release has been so all-encompassing that it has left he or she completely lost for words.  Have you ever listened to an album and been able to smell the aromas of the surrounding inspirations?  Taste the lavish approach of what senses the artist has composed for you?  With Fennesz' 'Black Sea', one can literally feel the cool sea breeze and the mists carried in the wind off the peaks of waves hitting you in the face gently, exploding one droplet at a time in the air of subtle perfection.  True, some may consider one or more of Fennesz' earlier works to be of his most grandeur pieces, perhaps namely 'Endless Summer', but for the dark-minded, the veteran of textured drone and ambient classical, this will prove to be a literal orgasm of sound. 

You know, its a mood, a subtle reflection to moments in the past that often make these releases see the light of day for an artist.  Its that moment, when a light flips on in his head and stays on for weeks at a time because of memories that have influenced the heart that lead to the dramatic and intense compositions that are found in an album like Black Seas.  With Fennesz' gentle guitar hums and sparse melodic twinges paired with striking computer pulses in a percussive measure at just the right moments, we see something that is simply just as beautiful as the cover artwork implies.  Life's simple visions that prove to and show us that beauty is reflected everywhere, a simple barge in a sandy sea at dusk, ripples in the rock and sand in memory of tides that once approached, or the scattered remnants of trees found in tiled glasswork, we are humbled and left breathless by such simple natural wonders.

What Fennesz has accomplished here goes far beyond the usual guitar drones of great artists such as Oren Ambarchi and Aidan Baker.  There are simple melodic textures here paired with the drone to bring out those simple images.  Where drone releases show us what's in the darkness, Fennesz finds that perfect moment when the warmth of the world is fading with the sun, leaving a beautiful lavendar across the sky to silhouette the towering beasts and trees.  The music on Black Sea is more than just music.  It is a sea unto itself, gently purling soundwaves into the listener, testing you, eroding your barriers away and washing over your fears and worries.  One could literally go on for volumes explaining the enchantment felt during the listening process of Black Seas, but to strike the point home, this is probably going to go down as one of Touch Records most notable releases of this decade.  

     



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