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Reviews
Attrition - Kill The Buddha!
Wednesday, July 01 2009 @ 03:00 AM PDT
Contributed by: ~Oren ben Yosef

Kill The Buddha!

Artist: Attrition United Kingdom

Title: Kill The Buddha!

Label: Projekt United States

Genre: Darkwave/ Goth   

Track Listing:

01 Invitation...
02 Favourite things
03 The head of Gabriel
04 Dante's kitchen
05 Dreamcatcher
06 A'dam & Eva
07 I am Eternity
08 Two Gods
09 The mercy machine
10 The long Hall
11 November 18th 2006



Recorded between 2006 and 2007, "Kill the Buddha!" marks the twenty fifth anniversary of one of Projekt's leading names and an almost  must have in every home of a clubbing Goth in these two and a half decades.  With this live album, recorded in various shows around the Usa, Europe and Mexico, Attrition make themselves as actual as ever, as Martin Bowes' haunting voice dominates with its blunt chill. Whispering, chanting and singing with dark beats and the enchanting operatic voice of Laurie Reade.
 
A live album has to hold an extra value over a studio recorded album, and not just offer a live alternative to the songs that can be found on earlier albums. In attrition's case, the live performance offers a darker approach to the music, as I see it. It's the lack of perfect conditions that are usually found in a studio recording that makes the two voices,  the ominous whisperer and the angelic siren stand out so boldly even when standing on the earthly ground of the stage they are performing on. "Two Gods" is a fine example, and far from the only one, for the great work between the two voices. Generally speaking, "Kill the Buddha!" offers many rhythmic beats that on one hand signal everyone to jump around, and on the other hand, grasping them by the heart and freezing them in their place. The blood chilling shouts from "The mercy machine", that desperate plea for help, must be a very effective and piercing when heard on a live performance and "The mercy machine" is placing itself as one of the highlights of this show.
 
A different twist from the dark rhythms that attrition is bombarding its audience with, "A'dam & Eva" is a high temp, Cabaret performance that gains more power on stage, bringing to mind the original Cabaret plays, of course, who were performed at times with no means to have any recording of such decadent act. The artificial musical sounds that attrition plays in this song make it even more distant, with a Blade runner taste to it, rather than a Marlene Dietrich's. "I am eternity" is a stirring and very powerful display of Reade's abilities, making her even more fascinating when standing in front of a crowd.
 
Writing (and reading!) a review about a live performance of a very well known artist is a tricky thing. Either you like Attrition, and so you will give this album a listen anyway, or you know you don't like them, and so will not give it a try , or you happen not to know them at all, in which case the question that should be asked is whether this live performance is a good start to get to know this veteran band or not. In any case, "Kill the Buddha!" is a powerful live performance and a good effort by attrition, and this fact will stay firm and cold like the rhythmic beats of Martin Bowes, against the above question – Where are YOU standing in relation to Attrition?

     


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